About Us

The Alexandra Centre Society (ACS) was created as a registered charity in 1975.

 

The Alexandra Centre, our building that we manage, has been at the heart and centre of the community since 1902 – and when threatened to be no more, brought our communities together to save a piece of our heritage. We are not a community centre, rather the center of our community. The ACS serves multiple communities and brings our communities together- rather than focus on one individual community alone. Bringing multiple communities together makes us stronger and allows for a larger reach in our City. The ACS helps support and strengthen our communities coming together and we offer resources beyond what local associations offer, and pickup the gaps where needed. We help engage more residents in matters that affect us all. We care for and protect a piece of Calgary’s history, while offering affordable spaces for essential services. We help support the wellbeing of our residents with many helpful and useful programs such as the CVITP tax program, Good Food Box depot, Food Security hampers, engaging classes and camps, and community use spaces.

 

Our Vision:

The Alexandra Centre Society (ACS) cultivates a vibrant, inclusive, local community where everyoneis welcome, and our historical legacy is celebrated.

 

Our Mission:

The Alexandra Centre Society (ACS) is a collaborative organization that serves the City of Calgary, and surrounding areas, and works to enhance, strengthen, and honour the heritage of Inglewood, Ramsay, Beltline - Victoria Park, and East Village. Through the promotion and delivery of cultural, social, educational, and recreational programs, the ACS fosters an inclusive and engaged community and facility space to be enjoyed for years to come.

 

Our Purpose:

The Society promotes and encourages educational, recreational, athletic and arts facilities, programs and equipment for the use and benefit of the residents of the City of Calgary and in particular, residents of the communities of Inglewood, Ramsay, Beltline - Victoria Park and East Village. In particular, the ACS endeavours to:

• Provide accessible resources, programs, services, and activities to our regional community;

• Provide educational, recreational, and social programs and services;

• Maintain the ACS facility, allowing space for activities;

• Improve life for residents in our communities;

• Celebrate ACS history, legacy, and heritage.

 

Our Objects:

The objects of the society are:

– To promote and provide educational, recreational, and athletic facilities and equipment for the use and benefit of residents of the City of Calgary;

– To promote, encourage, and assist the educational, charitable, athletic, and community endeavours within the City of Calgary;

– To purchase, lease, sublease, hire, or otherwise acquire and hold lands or buildings or any interest therein for the purpose of creating facilities for recreational and cultural uses and to do those things necessary to maintain and operate such premises;

– To receive, acquire, and hold gifts, donations, grants, legacies, and devises.

 

History:

The first Neighbourhood Improvement Program (N.I.P.) in Canada was launched right here.  With the funds allotted the main project was the restoration of the old Alexandra School building.  The purpose of the project was to create a space to house badly needed community services and programs.  The residents of Inglewood and Ramsay, in partnership with the late Jack Long, a local architect, fought to save the building from impending demolition.

A great celebration was held in June 1976 to open the "new" facility and recognize over 1000 hours of volunteer time needed to restore the dilapidated building.  A community eyesore was transformed into and remains the first and only community facility of its kind.

The Alexandra Centre Society (ACS) was registered in December 1975, as a charitable organization, to facilitate N.I.P. redevelopment projects, and ensure that the objectives of the Inglewood Ramsay Redevelopment Committee were carried out.  The Centre was home for the Inglewood Ramsay Redevelopment Centre in the later part of the 70's.

Today the building remains under the direction of the Alexandra Centre Society as a shared community resource for the communities of Inglewood, Ramsay, Belt line Victoria, and East Village.  The Alexandra Centre Society continues to serve the local communities and remains responsive to the needs of residents in the area.

The Alexandra Centre Society, Inglewood Child Development Centre, The Alexandra Medical Clinic, and The Kinkonauts Improv Theatre Society call the Alexandra Centre home.

Building History

  • Calgary's second sandstone school was built in 1902 by William Dodd, the same architect responsible for Calgary City Hall.  The building replaced the East Ward School.
  • The school was opened in 1903 as the New East Ward School.
  • In 1907 the school was doubled in size, to eight rooms, and named for Alexandra, Queen Consort of King Edward VII.
  • in 1910, William (Bible Bill) Aberhart became principle of the Alexandra School.  He became widely known as an evangelist and created the Social Credit Party in 1935.  Aberhart was premier of Alberta from 1935 to 1943.
  • In 1913-14 the top floor of the school housed a branch high school composed of three classes from Central high School.
  • The gymnasium was built onto the front entrance in 1952.
  • The school closed in 1962 and was transferred to the City of Calgary, and boarded up.  The gymnasium continued to be rented out to various groups for bingo and music events.
  • In 1973 Inglewood and Ramsay were designated a N.I.P. area and plans to save the building from demolition and restore it began.
  • June 1976 the Alexandra Centre opened.
  • The building celebrated its centennial in 2002.

...and whats been lost...

  • A.W. McVittie's cabin, built in 1882, now located at Heritage Park, was on this site alongside the school until the 1930's.  McVittie was the original surveyor of the CPR town site of Calgary and signed plans for the city in January 1884.

 

 

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